When should I upgrade my computer?

Knowing when to upgrade your computer is a bit of a guessing game for the average user. We generally keep banging away at them until the frustration of waiting half a century for the thing to boot up becomes too much. I usually intuit it’s time to upgrade when friends start saying things along the lines of ‘Jeez, I haven’t seen one of those since the introduction of colour television’.
The general rule, however, is that you should seriously consider upgrading your computer every four years. That might seem alarmingly regular to those of us who balk at the idea of spending $1000+ every four years, but remember that with computers like Macs, the resale value is quite respectable. If you have no issues with your current computer, then there’s no reason to rush out right on the four year mark and purchase a new one. If you are experiencing issues with speed, it might be a sign it’s time for an upgrade. But before you relegate it to the dustbin, check your troubleshooting page to make sure it’s not something that can be resolved without having to upgrade your computer.

Some sure signs that things may be sufficiently awry with your battered old faithful to justify upgrading to a new computer include:

  • You’ve installed new software which has markedly decreased the overall performance of your computer
  • Your operating system is so old it wears gladiator sandals/ you know you would benefit from upgrading to a newer version (i.e latest version of Windows)
  • When you attempt to install new software or games, the system does not meet requirements
  • You fly out of town for the weekend and can’t pack your underpants as your PC uses up all of your weight allowance

Even if you’re no tech head, you’ll probably have an inkling of when it’s time to upgrade your computer. If you’ve not experienced any red flag moments, and use your computer primarily as a recreational tool, then upgrading isn’t a matter of urgency. For those who depend on their computers for work or study, sticking approximately to the four-year guideline will help to prevent any catastrophic glitches brought on by an out-dated, sluggish system.